A Brief Guide to Kissing Disease Pt 2

Prevention and Treatment Options

As the contagious disease is spread through saliva, it is recommended not to kiss others with the virus infection or share food or drinks with them. There is no vaccine to prevent mononucleosis yet, and only proper awareness can prevent the disease from spreading. There is no particular therapy or cure to treat mono either, and antibiotics do not work against the viral infections as well. Treatment options mainly involve taking care of self with enough rest and a healthy diet including lots of fluids.

Painkillers can be taken to counter the effects of fever and sore throat, but only after due consultation with the doctor. Similarly, the secondary infections caused by Epstein-Barr virus, such as strep and tonsillitis, can be dealt with accordingly with the use of antibiotics. However, amoxicillin and other penicillin derivatives are not recommended to people with mononucleosis because that may lead to rashes and irritation.

Remedies to Treat Kissing Disease

  • Drinking plenty of fluids helps greatly in relieving the symptoms of mono. At the same time, taking over-the-counter medications, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, would help in dealing with the fever and sore throat.
  • Mix ½ tsp salt in 8 oz. warm water and gargle with it several times a day. This simple method can help amazingly in relieving sore throat problems.
  • Do not engage in physical activities like workouts and sports until a few weeks after the fever has subsided. Remember that the more rest you can get, the sooner it would help you to recover.
  • Avoid heavy lifting or any type of contact sports for at least one month after you have totally recovered. This would make sure that no lingering symptom of mono causes you to rupture your spleen.
  • It might take some time to heal completely, so be patient and follow the exercise program recommended by your doctor to rebuild your strength during the recovery period.

Remember that mononucleosis infection does not require a person to be quarantined. In fact, many people grow immunity to the contagious disease because of their exposure to the Epstein-Barr virus during their childhood days. Yet again, staying home and resting would be better until you have fully recovered. You can always consult with the experts at your nearby community health care center for any assistance as well as to learn more about kissing disease and work on a treatment plan to get well soon.